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Microcirculation

Hong Zhao

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Ph.D. Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, 2006
M.S. Mathematics, 2005
M.S. Mechanical Engineering, 2002

University of Science and Technology of China
B.S. Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, 2000



My research focuses on the flow physics in microcirculation, which is dominated by the cell--cell and cell--wall interactions. One problem of our particular interest is the effect of red cells on the margination of platelets, which is of critical importance for proper blood clotting. We have developed a highly efficient boundary integral equation method that fully resolves the flow structure interactions between deformable red cells, platelets that are modeled as rigid discoids, and wall boundaries. The simulation reproduces the near wall platelet concentration as observed in experiments.

Another area of my research is the rheology of vesicles, which have attracted much interests because of the simplicity in their physical properties and the their potential usage for drug delivery. A vesicle is essentially a lipid bilayer that itself behaves as a two-dimensional incompressible fluid but shows bending resistance. Using numerical simulations based on Stokes flow boundary integral equations, we obtain flow regime diagram of a single vesicle in unbounded shear flow that quantitatively agrees with high-order perturbation analysis. We currently focus on studying the rheology of vesicles that are confined by wall boundaries as in microfluidic devices, as well as the effect of vesicle--vesicle interactions.

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